Weekly ToDo for Area Gardeners

A weekly todo reference for those who garden in Silicon Valley. (Click on plant name for specifics…). Weekly garden todo list

Share the abundance...
Share the abundance...

September sees the planting of fall crops. Yes, it is time for some of your beloved Brassica and leafy crops to take center stage as the daylight hours the garden grows by begin to dwindle. Decide which tomato plants to take out to make room for fall crops and which to keep in to produce late tomatoes for sharing.

Week 38

Plant in the ground

Plant In The Ground

  • Arugula
  • Baby Blue Eyes
  • Beets
  • California Poppies
  • Carrots
  • Chard
  • Clarkia
  • Fava Beans
  • Fennel
  • Garlic
  • Godetia
  • Lettuce
  • Mustard Greens
  • Nigella
  • Parsnips
  • Peas
  • Radishes
  • Salsify
  • Spinach
  • Sweet Peas
  • Turnips
  • Zucchini

Plant in flats

Plant In Flats

  • Arugula
  • Beets
  • Calendulas
  • Chard
  • Collards
  • Columbine
  • Foxglove
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Mustard Greens
  • Onions
  • Pansies
  • Peas
  • Poppies (Iceland and Oriental)
  • Rutabagas
  • Spinach
  • Violas

Transplant to the ground

Transplant From Flats To Ground

  • Arugula
  • Beets
  • Bok Choi
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Calendulas
  • Carnations
  • Chard
  • Collards
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Mustard Greens
  • Onions
  • Pansies
  • Peas
  • Radicchio
  • Rutabagas
  • Spinach

Tasks to do this week

Garden Tasks

  • Build/renew compost piles with materials cleared from summer beds.
  • As beneficial insect activities diminish, be watchful for pests in the fall garden.
  • Keep as many flowering plants as possible available for the bees.
  • Sow cover crops into beds as they are havested.

Information presented on our weekly todo pages is for Santa Clara County. A majority of Silicon Valley communities fall within USDA Hardiness Zone 9b, the exceptions (for Santa Clara county) being those who have a zip code of 94041, 94043, or 94089; the folks at these zip codes have been assigned a Hardiness Zone of 10a. Even so, remember that we live in the land of the microclimate: growers in Palo Alto have different concerns and face different challenges than those who grow in South San Jose.

As a result of life in our ideal Mediterranean climate, local growers enjoy the possibility of making use of multiple plantings in a single growing season for many of the veggies we know and love. Those wishing to take advantage of this need to pay close attention to the grow information of the varieties being put in; a second planting of a particular crop normally involves plants with a shorter growing period.

Info presented here has been distilled from a variety of sources, the most notable being Seed Savers Exchange, Life Lab Garden Classroom, and Ecology Action of the Midpeninsula, and Master Gardeners of Santa Clara County.