Weekly ToDo for Area Gardeners

A weekly todo reference for those who garden in Silicon Valley. (Click on plant name for specifics…). Weekly garden todo list

Prepare and preserve...
Prepare and preserve...

Look to August as a time to preserve the abundance of the summer harvest. Whether through hot water bath canning, pressure canning, vacuum sealing, or selective freezing, this is a time to put up summer produce for use during the slow winter months. Pull spent plants, adding them to the compost pile.

Week 33

Plant in the ground

Plant In The Ground

  • Arugula
  • Beets
  • Corn (early, short season varieties)
  • Fava Beans
  • Nasturtiums
  • Onions
  • Parsnips
  • Peas
  • Radishes
  • Sweet Alyssum
  • Sweet Peas
  • Turnips
  • Zucchini
Plant in flats

Plant In Flats

  • Arugula
  • Beets
  • Bok Choi
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Calendulas
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Chard
  • Collards
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Larkspur
  • Leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Linaria
  • Marigolds
  • Mustard Greens
  • Nemesia
  • Onions
  • Pansies
  • Peas
  • Poppies (Iceland and Oriental)
  • Rutabagas
  • Snapdragons
  • Spinach
  • Stock
  • Violas
Transplant to the ground

Transplant From Flats To Ground

  • Arugula
  • Beets
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Chard
  • Collards
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Lettuce
  • Mustard
  • New Zealand Spinach
  • Radicchio
  • Violas
Tasks to do this week

Garden Tasks

  • Water well and often.
  • Turn compost piles and keep them moist.
  • Cover plants with row cover during particularly hot periods.
  • Continue harvesting to prolong plant vigor and production.
  • Save seed from the vegetables and flowers that have done well in the garden.

Information presented on our weekly todo pages is for Santa Clara County. A majority of Silicon Valley communities fall within USDA Hardiness Zone 9b, the exceptions (for Santa Clara county) being those who have a zip code of 94041, 94043, or 94089; the folks at these zip codes have been assigned a Hardiness Zone of 10a. Even so, remember that we live in the land of the microclimate: growers in Palo Alto have different concerns and face different challenges than those who grow in South San Jose.

As a result of life in our ideal Mediterranean climate, local growers enjoy the possibility of making use of multiple plantings in a single growing season for many of the veggies we know and love. Those wishing to take advantage of this need to pay close attention to the grow information of the varieties being put in; a second planting of a particular crop normally involves plants with a shorter growing period.

Info presented here has been distilled from a variety of sources, the most notable being Seed Savers Exchange, Life Lab Garden Classroom, and Ecology Action of the Midpeninsula, and Master Gardeners of Santa Clara County.